More Twill

Work is moving along and Burning Daylight Studios is keeping me plenty busy, and is proving to be a suitable home to Daylight Weaving. I know it sounds confusing, but I really like both names, so I kept them both, on for the physical studio, and one for the business. My goal here is to try to post at least a couple times a month, so stay tuned.

Last we met, I was finishing a series twill rugs.  This is just a short post as an excuse to share photos of the last in that series.

Twill weave rugI used some random grey yarn that I had lots of, but it turned out to be rather a pain to weave with.  It didn’t behave well – kept getting tangled and didn’t pack down consistently – but it did create an interesting ropy effect.  And I have to admit, it took me a while to warm up to this rug. I had it hanging in the studio unfinished for months because it had so annoyed me while weaving.  I have come to think of this rug as being inspired by the sea. The pattern in the previous rug had a wheat shaft look to it, whereas this rug’s pattern reminds me of seaweed.

Twill weave rug detail

I finished it with a folded hem.

Twill weave rug end detail

Twill weave rug detail

In all, it ended up as a nice sturdy rug that will make the right person happy to walk on in its new home.

Up next: Production work

 

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Crazy Twill

Wow, has it really been that long?  It’s been a busy Summer and Fall, full of visitors, weaving experiments, the County Fair, apple harvesting, and generally preparing for the winter months.  Also – Hey, I’m a business!  Daylight Weaving, I call myself, complete with business cards, my first cell phone (!), and a new website.  I even had a booth at the Summer Art Festival.  That was pretty exciting, since it was the first time for me selling my work.

I started my summer thinking I would try something new.  I saw a picture of a rug and, as I often do, thought how on earth did they do that.  After several days of playing around with designs and different loom setups, I had something I wanted to try out.  Of course it was nothing like the thing that got me on the path to this experiment, but I was ready to try this new idea I had come up with.  I won’t bother trying to explain what I did, since I’ve tried to explain it to other weavers without success.  Suffice it to say that it is a 2/2 twill weave pattern using a block design.

dsc_1612_sm

Closeup of the pattern details:

dsc_1615_smdsc_1610_smIt’s one of those designs that I could have done all kinds of crazy things, but just because you can, doesn’t mean you should – each looked more eye-crossing that the last.  I eventually narrowed it down to three different designs, but in the end, just used one. The second one, was the same, but with blue instead of red, resulting in a very different look.

dsc_1618_smdsc_1621_smFor the third rug, I used a repeat of some of the simpler elements or the original pattern.  I thought I’d try three colors this time, which gave it a 3-D effect.

dsc_1642_smAnd no fringe this time.

dsc_1650_smApparently, the judge at the County Fair liked it enough to award it Best in Show!  They have scribes write down the judges comments.  She actually used the word “inhuman” in describing the selvedges.  Considering some of the other entries in the Fiber Arts exhibit, I have to say I am quite humbled.

img_5429Those three rugs took all summer.  As I had more warp left on the loom, I made two more simpler twill rugs.  Here’s the unfinished first of the two. They are based on a traditional pattern I found in The Weaving, Spinning and Dyeing Book, by Rachel Brown – out of print, I think, but well worth finding at a good used book store.  Mrs. Daylight calls it the wheat shaft pattern.  The gold and reds I dyed myself.

rug-50 The second is similar and still waiting to be hemmed. Photos maybe next time.

Now that I’ve committed to being a professional, I have to get busy and make more product.  And in the mean time, I’ll make an effort to keep my faithful readers updated on what goes on here in the studio.